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Ubuntu

UbuntuUbuntu Desktop is a Linux distribution derived from Debian. It is one of the most popular (Desktop) Linux distributions available, and many other distributions are derived from it. Development is sponsored by Canonical.

There are two editions of Ubuntu Desktop – Ubuntu Desktop and Ubuntu Desktop Alternate Installer. The only difference lies in the installation programs. Ubuntu Desktop has a simple, graphical installer, while Ubuntu Desktop Alternate Installer has an ncurses installation program. It is suitable for use on low-resource computers.

Installation Program and Installation Process: The graphical installation program of Ubuntu Desktop is very basic, and lacks support for disk encryption, LVM, the Linux Logical Volume Manager, and RAID. There is an option to encrypt the home directory, but that is the lone, physical security feature it has.
Uinstall11

The alternate installer edition, with the ncurses interface, has support for LVM, disk encryption and RAID. It also has the option to encrypt the home directory.
uLVM

Desktop Environments: Starting from the 11.04 release, Ubuntu ships with the Unity as the default desktop, with a fallback to GNOME 2 for machines that do not meet the minimum hardware requirements for running Unity.
Udesktop

Installed Applications and Software Management Out of the box, Ubuntu comes with most of the software that the vast majority of users would need for their daily computing needs. Those that are not pre-installed, like non-free applications and codecs, can be installed if the appropriate repository is enabled. Like on any other Linux distribution, the software repository contains thousands of free applications that you can install.

Debian’s Advanced Packaging Tool, APT, is the application management framework on Ubuntu. The most common command line utility for managing applications is apt-get, with Synaptic and Software Center as the user-friendly, graphical frontends. Both graphical applications are installed out of the box, but Synaptic offers a lot more features than the newer Software Center. The Software Center offers paid applications from Canonical’s software partners, but those are few, compared to the free applications in the default repository.
swcenter

Graphical Administrative Applications: If you are running Unity, the graphical administrative applications are in the System Settings. In Fallback mode, that is, if you are running GNOME 2, they are accessible from System > Preferences and System > Administration menus.
settings

Physical and Network Security Posture: Per physical security, Ubuntu Desktop with the graphical installer has a very bad physical security posture. For starters, the installer does not support disk encryption, and it does not provide the option to password-protect the boot loader. These are two features that are used to enhance the physical security posture of a system.

Because the Alternate Installer version of supports full disk encryption, it is possible to present a better physical security profile, and, therefore, achieve a higher security rating than if you use the graphical installer edition.

A new installation of Ubuntu 11.04 has only one open port – 631, the Internet Printing Protocol port. The firewall is not configured, and Gufw, one of 3 graphical clients for managing ufw, the command line frontend to IPTables, is not installed. AppArmor, the mandatory access control program is loaded, in enforcing mode. Ten (10) profiles are loaded by default.

Hardware Requirements and Resources: Ubuntu is supported on both 32-bit and 64-bit Intel-compatible platforms. To run the Unity desktop, a computer with 3D-accelerated graphics is required. Recommended minimum memory requirement is 512 MB. However, 1 GB or more, will make your computing life a little bit less stressful. The minimum disk space required to install the latest edition is 4.4 GB.

Download links for the latest stable editions of Ubuntu are available here. Official documentation and other support links are available here and at Questions and Answers.

Recent Reviews and Tutorials: The most recent reviews and tutorials on Ubuntu Desktop published on this website are listed below. You may peruse the full list of reviews and tutorials here:

  • Upgrade Ubuntu 12.04 server to 14.04 ‘Tis the season for upgrading. First was upgrading OSSEC from 2.7 to 2.8, see Upgrading OSSEC 2.7 to 2.8 and the bro-ids rule issue. Now’s the time to upgrade the server that OSSEC was protecting. Before the upgrade, the server was running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. It was upgraded to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS less than an hour ...
  • Triple-boot Windows 7 and 8 and Ubuntu 14.04 on a PC with UEFI firmware This tutorial provides a step-by-step guide on how to triple-boot Windows 7 and 8 and Ubuntu 14.04 on a computer with UEFI firmware and on a single hard disk drive (HDD). The working assumption is that the first OS on the computer, which could be OEM or self-built, is Windows 8. Windows 7 will be installed ...
  • Dual-boot Ubuntu 14.04 & Windows 7 on a PC with 2 HDDs and UEFI firmware This post shows how to dual-boot Ubuntu 14.04 and Windows 7 on a computer with two hard disk drives (HDD) and UEFI firmware. The test computer used for this tutorial has a 500 GB and a 320 GB hard drives connected, with Windows 7 Pro installed on the 500 GB HDD. The screenshots and descriptions ...
  • Dual-boot Ubuntu 14.04 and Windows 7 on a PC with UEFI firmware This post shows how to dual-boot Ubuntu 14.04 and Windows 7 on a computer with UEFI firmware. Note that the computer I used for the tutorial is not an OEM one. Rather, it is a custom-built computer, with an ASRock motherboard and Intel Core i3 processor. However, if you follow this guide step-by-step, you should ...
  • How to install Ubuntu 14.04 on encrypted MBR partitions This tutorial shows how to install Ubuntu 14.04 on encrypted MBR partitions. It is only slightly different from Manual full disk encryption setup guide for Ubuntu 13.10 & Linux Mint 16. The only difference: A partition mounted at /home is not part of the mix. But there’s no real reason for not creating a separate ...
  • How to upgrade Ubuntu 12.04 LTS to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS This article shows how to upgrade Ubuntu 12.04 LTS to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Warning: Before upgrading, backup your data. Note that it is generally not recommended to upgrade from one LTS (Long-Term Support) release to the latest LTS edition until a point edition of the latest LTS has been released. For example, you are not expected to ...
  • 4 things to do after installing Ubuntu 14.04 So now that you’ve installed your new copy of Ubuntu 14.04, there must be at least one default setting that you would like to change. At least one. On my new installation, I found four of those default settings that when modified, made using Unity, the Ubuntu desktop, a little bit more user-friendly. This post show what ...
  • GPT disk partitioning guide for Ubuntu 13.10 on a PC with UEFI firmware This article offers a step-by-step guide on how to create GPT partitions on Ubuntu 13.10 on a computer with UEFI firmware. Because Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu and use the same installer as its parent distribution, it can also be used to create GPT partitions on Linux Mint 16. Before I started on this ...
  • Dual-boot Windows 8 or Windows 7 and Ubuntu 13.10, with Ubuntu on a btrfs filesystem This tutorial offers a step-by-step guide on how to dual-boot Windows 8 and Ubuntu 13.10 on a single hard disk drive (HDD), with Ubuntu on a btrfs filesystem. This dual-boot setup is on a system with Legacy BIOS, that is, non-UEFI and using an MBR disk partitioning scheme, which means that GPT is not involved. Because ...
  • How to install Ubuntu 13.10 and Linux Mint 16 on a Btrfs filesystem This tutorial presents a step-by-step guide on how to install Linux Mint 16 and Ubuntu 13.10 on a Btrfs filesystem. Btrfs is CoW (Copy on Write) filesystem with support for features like read-only and writable snapshots, subvolumes, incremental backups, deduplication, and multiple device support. You may view the complete list of features here. The screen shots used ...

Screenshots: More screenshots from the latest edition of Ubuntu Desktop.

Installed and available Educational applications on Ubuntu 11.04.
Uapps1

Installed and available games.
Uapps2

Installed and available Internet applications.
Uapps3

Installed and available multimedia applications.
Uapps4

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