Archive for January, 2010

Open standards made mandatory for public administrations

Open standards made mandatory for public administrations

Open standards have been made mandatory for the IT systems of Hungary’s public administrations. The Hungarian parliament voted in favour of amendments prescribing open standards, to a law on electronic government services, on 14 December. The changes received 197 votes in favour, one against and 146 abstentions, according to the Open Standard Alliance, a Hungarian advocacy group that lobbyed in […]

Convert flash to Ogg with TinyOgg

Convert flash to Ogg with TinyOgg

TinyOgg is a new Web application that makes it possible to “watch and listen to Flash-based videos without the need to Flash technology.” And it does this by first converting any flash video file to an Ogg (Theora) format. Ogg Theora is a “free and open video compression format from the Xiph.org Foundation”.

12 Trends to Watch in 2010

12 Trends to Watch in 2010

It’s the dawn of a new year. From our perch on the frontier of electronic civil liberties, EFF has collected a list of a dozen important trends in law, technology and business that we think will play a significant role in shaping online rights in 2010. In December, we’ll revisit this post and see how it all worked out. 1. […]

Configure the graphical firewall client on Linux Mint 8

Configure the graphical firewall client on Linux Mint 8

Linux Mint 8 (aka Helena) is the latest version of the popular, desktop-oriented distribution. It is based on Ubuntu 9.10, and like Ubuntu, it comes with ufw, the uncomplicated firewall, running out of the box (actually, on Mint 8, it is not enabled). Ufw presents a user-friendly command line syntax for managing IPTables/Netfilter. However, a graphical interface presents an even […]

Putting the “Public” In Publicly-Funded Research

Putting the “Public” In Publicly-Funded Research

By Corynne McSherry: Sometimes an idea is so blindingly, obviously good that you have to wonder why it hasn’t already been implemented. A few years ago, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) had an idea like that. Why not create a free, public, online archive of findings from research studies that were funded by Americans’ tax dollars? That way, members […]

Free software without the freedom?

Free software without the freedom?

Editor’s note: This article was written by John Sullivan in February of 2006. While the date of original publication is old, the points discussed are still in play today. If you’ve never read this, or are new to the concept of Free Software, this short article is worth reading. This is a response to an article by John Carroll, addressing […]

On Selling Exceptions to the GNU GPL

On Selling Exceptions to the GNU GPL

When I co-signed the letter objecting to Oracle’s planned purchase of MySQL 1 (along with the rest of Sun), some free software supporters were surprised that I approved of the practice of selling license exceptions which the MySQL developers have used. They expected me to condemn the practice outright. This article explains what I think of the practice, and why. […]

Qt Graphics and Performance – OpenGL

Qt Graphics and Performance – OpenGL

Introduction Here’s the next instalment of the graphics performance blog series. We’ll begin by looking at some background about how OpenGL and QPainter work. We’ll then dive into how the two are married together in OpenGL 2 Paint Engine and finish off with some advice about how to get the best out of the engine. Enjoy! Why OpenGL? Before I […]

The Economic Case for Open Source Foundations

Abstract An open source foun­da­tion is a group of peo­ple and com­pa­nies that has come together to jointly develop com­mu­nity open source soft­ware. Exam­ples include the Apache Soft­ware Foun­da­tion, the Eclipse Foun­da­tion, and the Gnome Foundation. There are many rea­sons why soft­ware devel­op­ment firms join and sup­port a foun­da­tion. One com­mon eco­nomic moti­va­tion is to save costs in the devel­op­ment […]

Linux Mint 8 review

Linux Mint 8 review

Linux Mint 8 (aka Helena) is the latest version of the popular, desktop-oriented distribution. Helena was actually released late last year, but I’ve just gotten around to reviewing it. As with prior releases of Mint, Helena is based on the latest version of Ubuntu, which in this case is Karmic Koala. For this review, I’ll go through the features of […]

Privacy by Design: The 7 Foundational Principles

Privacy by Design is a concept I developed back in the 90’s, to address the ever-growing and systemic effects of Information and Communication Technologies, and of large-scale networked data systems. Privacy by Design advances the view that the future of privacy cannot be assured solely by compliance with regulatory frameworks; rather, privacy assurance must ideally become an organization’s default mode […]