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Dual-boot Windows 7 and Kali Linux

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The next partition will be mounted at /. A new installation of Kali Linux takes up about 6.4 GB of disk space, so any amount greater than that will do. For the test installation, I gave it 60 GB, which is way too much, so you do not have to do the same. About 10-12 GB is more than enough. Continue.
Dual-boot Windows 7 and Kali Linux

Here are the details of the new partition. Scroll to “Done setting up the partition,” then click Continue.
Dual-boot Windows 7 and Kali Linux

For the home partition, I gave it a disk space of 100 GB. Continue.
Kali Linux 1.0

Here are the details of the new partition. Scroll to “Done setting up the partition,” then click Continue.
Dual-boot Windows 7 and Kali Linux

For Swap, 2 GB is good enough. Continue.
Dual-boot Windows 7 and Kali Linux

Here are the default details of the new partition. To specify that it be used as a Swap partition, double-click the “Use as” line.
Kali Linux

Then select “swap area.” Continue.
Kali Linux Windows 7 dual-boot

Scroll to “Done setting up the partition,” then click Continue.
Kali Linux dual-boot Windows 7

With all the partitions created, scroll to “Finish partitioning and write changes to disk.” Continue. Make note of the device number of the boot partition. Here, it is sda5. You’ll need it later.
Dual-boot Windows 7 and Kali Linux

Select “Yes.” Continue.
Dual-boot Windows 7 and Kali Linux

By default, the installer will want to install GRUB, the boot loader, in the Master Boot Record (MBR). However, for setting up this dual-boot system, we want GRUB in the boot partition. So, select “No.” Continue.
Dual-boot Windows 7 and Kali Linux

This is where you have to specify where GRUB should be installed. For this test system, it is /dev/sda5. Continue.
Dual-boot Windows 7 and Kali Linux

After installation, the computer will reboot into Windows 7. The next task involves add an entry for Kali Linux in Windows 7’s boot menu.

3. Add Kali Linux to Windows 7’s boot menu: The simplest graphical application for modifying the Boot Configuration Data of Window that I know, is EasyBCD. It is free for personal use. You may download it from here. Install it as you would any other Windows application. The main window is shown below. To add an entry for Kali Linux in the boot menu, click on the Add New Entry tab.
Windows 7 EasyBCD

Then click on the Linux/BSD tab. From the Type dropdown menu, select GRUB 2. Modify the name field to reflect the name of the distribution you are adding. From the Drive menu, you can either select the specific partition corresponding to the boot partition of the Kali Linux installation or let EasyBCD automatically locate and load it. Either one will work. Note that EasyBCD’s drive numbers and the device numbers of the Linux partitions do not match. For example, in this test installation, the boot partition is /dev/sda5, but the corresponding drive number in EasyBCD is Partition 3. The size of the partition helps to determine which one it is. Click the Add Entry button when wll the options have been specified.
Windows 7 EasyBCD Linux GRUB 2

From the Edit Boot Menu tab, you can see a preview of the entries that will appear in the Windows 7 boot menu. Exit EasyBCD and reboot the computer. That should do it.
Windows 7 Kali Linux EasyBCD Preview

Extra: Here are all the partitions on the HDD as seen from the Windows 7 partition manager.
Windows 7, Kali Linux Partitions

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58 Comments

  1. siddarth says:

    hi, i have win 8.1 in my c drive , and i have 2 other partitions, i have installed kali in a 30gb(sda #7) partition , but at the last step of installation while we have to install grub , it says “no other operating system detected” so its not detecting windows , now i chose option “no” and gave /dev/sda7 . now i restarted and went into windows and with easybcd i added kali option in boot menu , but when i click on that option it doesnt boot into kali it says some files missing

    • finid says:

      I’m guessing that since you’re installing Windows 8.1, that the hardware has UEFI firmware. If true, this is not the right guide to use.

      Does you computer use UEFI firmware?

      • siddarth says:

        yes the bios mode is uefi , what is the correct way to do it?

        • finid says:

          Log into Windows and delete the partitions that were created when you attempt to install Kali. Then make sure that you have a single partition with enough space for Kali, so when you start the installation process, point the installer to that free space. I haven’t tried this with Kali, so I’m not sure, but it might be necessary to partition the space manually.

          Kali will install GRUB to the /boot/efi partition, so you will not need to use EasyBCD.

          I’ll try and write a detailed tutorial on this this week.

          by the way, what PC model are you using?

          • siddarth says:

            acer travelmate p643-m

          • siddarth says:

            u mean install kali on the same partition as windows?

          • finid says:

            No, install Kali on a separate partition. That will likely be space that you used in the previous attempt. I just wanted to make sure that that space will be in one partition, since from the previous installation attempt, the Kali installer had partitioned that space into at least 2 partitions

            If you’ve not done this before, you might want to hold on while I put together a detailed tutorial on how to do it.

            When you log into Windows, how many partitions do you see from the partition manager. If you can take a screenshot and post it at the forum. That will help me in getting the tutorial right.

          • siddarth says:

            where should i upload screenshot? btw i can see 5 partitions ,
            300 mb healthy(recovery partition),
            c drive has windows
            new volume d has other files
            and there is a 29.30 gb partition in which i hav installed kali its healthy(EFI partition),
            and 100mb healthy(EFI system partition)

          • finid says:

            No need to upload the screenshot.

            Ok, is D a partition that you made yourself, right?

            If you installed Kali, there should be more than 1 Linux partition for it, though Windows will only see then as “healthy primary partitions”. IF you want to retry the installation, delete the Kali partition, so it is blank. Then retyr the installation. The Kali installer will install GRUB in the EFI system partition. If it does not offer automatic disk partitioning and you have to create the partitions manually, do not create a boot partition. Only create a partition for root and Swap. Optionally, you may create one for /home.

          • siddarth says:

            what about the 100mb (efi syatem partition) is it related to kali , should i delete that too before re-installiing?

          • finid says:

            No, don’t touch that. That was created by Windows, but Kali will install GRUB there.

          • finid says:

            I have a solution, which I’ll publish in a detailed tutorial before noon today.

          • siddarth says:

            ok give me the link

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