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9 Comments

  1. 4

    Paleoflatus

    I did an extension search in Iceweasel, but couldn’t find it, so I downloaded the latest Firefox and it can’t find it either.
    If it existed, I’d be quite interested to try it.

    Reply
    1. 4.1

      finid

      Just clicking on its link in the article takes you to the extensions page. And on a search of “collusion,” it was the first item returned.

      Reply
      1. 4.1.1

        Paleoflatus

        Thanks for the prompt and helpful advice. I’ve found my problem. I originally read your article in Chromium, then loaded Firefox and looked for it in the Extensions. It failed to appear.
        With your advice, I loaded your article directly in Firefox and clicked the link. As you said, it came up on the Add-ons page, but there’s a message that it isn’t available for version 17.0.7 – which is what I have.
        I think I’ll just have to wait for a bit.

        Reply
  2. 3

    netg00r00

    Lets not forget about Tor browser bundle. A bundled package of software that is free and uses the latest “do not track me” technology.
    Everyone can check it out here.
    https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en

    Reply
  3. 2

    Vik

    very cool.
    I opened http://www.askjeeves.com and saw a bigger web that nytimes.com 😀

    Reply
  4. 1

    Todd

    Instead of dis-allowing cookies, try using a privacy plugin like Ghostery. Before installing, Linux Today informed 14 sites. After installing ( and resetting Collusion report), it only informed 7 sites.

    Good to see a visual that ghostery is doing what it is supposed to do.

    Reply
    1. 1.1

      netg00r00

      Ghostery is bought and paid for by corporations that are looking for and watching web site traffic. Take a read of this.. http://venturebeat.com/2012/07/31/ghostery-a-web-tracking-blocker-that-actually-helps-the-ad-industry/

      As always, do your own research but, I personally do not use ghostery any longer. I only use TOR now.

      Reply
      1. 1.1.1

        Duncan

        Try the RequestPolicy extension. IIRC, I actually found it recommended on an earlier discussion of collusion. Eventually, I ended up uninstalling collusion as there simply wasn’t much left for it to report — the only sites it listed were sites I already knew about as I had specifically allowed them in RequestPolicy.

        Of course, that /does/ come with a non-trivial amount of hassle-cost, especially at first, until you’ve set normal permissions for all the sites you normally visit, and especially for images and scripts, because one thing you find out real fast with this extension is just how many sites link to off-site images as well as off-site scripts. But it does get better. After a couple days you’ll notice less hassle on the sites you visit nearly daily, and after a week or two, you’ll find most of the permissions you’re setting are now one-shot/temporary, as you don’t visit the site (or your favorites sites don’t link to a site) often enough to make it worth setting a permanent permission for.

        The one thing I wish RequestPolicy had was something like Noscript’s untrusted sites list, to take them off of the list that appears all the time. Google-analytics, the big ad-networks and the social sites (twitter, facebook, reddit, stumbleupon, dig, del.icio.us, etc) all end up on noscript’s untrusted list, but request-policy doesn’t have such a list, so they continue to show up in candidate list and I have to continuously ignore them.

        The other thing that would be nice would be no-script integration, such that allowing a site in no-script would auto-allow it in request-policy as well, instead of having to allow it twice, once in each, since allowing a script in no-script doesn’t help if request-policy is blocking the request for the script in the first place. (But allowing in request-policy wouldn’t allow in no-script, as someone could well want to unblock image serves, for instance, without allowing scripts from the same site to run.)

        But there’s a bonus, too. With a nicely setup RequestPolicy, the need for an ad-blocker pretty much disappears, since very /very/ few sites serve their own ads, meaning the ad-sites all appear in RequestPolicy, and if you don’t allow the requests…

        And without a half-dozen or more additional sites to load content from, web pages load much faster, too. =:^)

        Duncan

        Reply
        1. 1.1.1.1

          finid

          The RequestPolicy info page, the recommendation is to use it and NoScript together, so the coders of RequestPolicy know the limitations of their extension.

          I’ll install it and see how it goes.

          Reply

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