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Post Tagged with: "privacy and licensing"

Why Public Education Must Use Public Software

Why Public Education Must Use Public Software

This is an essay that attempts to argue in favor of promoting and using free software for public education in the United States. With some modification it should be usable worldwide. Edit it mercilessly as you would any other FDL-licensed text. Originally written on February 7-9, 2009 by Dara Adib. Public education ideally provides a comprehensive education for every citizen […]

Why “Open Source” misses the point of Free Software

By Richard Stallman: When we call software “free,” we mean that it respects the users’ essential freedoms: the freedom to run it, to study and change it, and to redistribute copies with or without changes. This is a matter of freedom, not price, so think of “free speech,” not “free beer.” These freedoms are vitally important. They are essential, not […]

Why free software shouldn’t depend on Mono or C#

by Richard M. Stallman Debian’s decision to include Mono in its principal way of installing GNOME, for the sake of Tomboy which is an application written in C#, leads the community in a risky direction. It is dangerous to depend on C#, so we need to discourage its use. The problem is not unique to Mono; any free implementation of […]

Bilski Ruling and Software Patents

Bilski Ruling and Software Patents

As opinions form about the extent to which the Court ruling impacts the patenting of software, one thing is clear. The State Street ruling that in 1998 opened the flood gates to the patenting of business methods and software has been gutted, if not technically overturned.

A Privacy Agenda for the New Administration

A Privacy Agenda for the New Administration

This is the first post in a three part series directed at restoring some of the civil liberties we’ve lost over the past eight years. Today’s post is about our privacy rights. We’ll follow this up early next week with our thoughts on intellectual property rights and government transparency.