Post Tagged with: "privacy"

The Internet Society on the Wikileaks issue

Recently, we have witnessed the effective disappearance from the Internet of a website made infamous through international press coverage and political intrigue. The Internet Society is founded upon key principles of free expression and non discrimination that are essential to preserve the openness and utility of the Internet. We believe that this incident dramatically illustrates that those principles are currently […]

ISPs Free To Continue Deleting Evidence Against File-Sharers

Sweden’s highest court has rejected an application by an anti-piracy group which would force an ISP to hand over the identity of a file-sharing site operator. Antipiratbyrån wants TeliaSonera to reveal who is behind the SweTorrents BitTorrent tracker but the ISP has refused and taken its case all the way to the Supreme Court. That Court has now decided that […]

E-Book Buyer’s Guide to E-Book Privacy

With the 2010 holidays upon us, it’s time to update EFF’s E-Book Buyer’s Guide to E-Book Privacy, which summarizes and comments on the privacy-related policies of several e-readers. What’s new. We’ve added in the iPad and also added in the software used by many libraries and devices for e-book access, made by Adobe called Adobe Content Server. Adobe doesn’t keep […]

Profiling Based on Mobile, Online Behavior: A Privacy Issue

It’s illegal for businesses and law enforcement to profile a person based on their race, gender, or ethnicity, yet millions of Americans are being profiled every day based on their online consumer behavior and demographics. Known as consumer profiling for behavioral advertising purposes, this type of profiling is largely unregulated. The result, according to two recent articles in the journal […]

Your Web Surfing History Is Accessible Without Your Permission

The Web surfing history saved in your Web browser can be accessed without your permission. JavaScript code deployed by real websites and online advertising providers use browser vulnerabilities to determine which sites you have and have not visited, according to new research from computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego. “JavaScript is a great thing, it allows things […]

FTC’s New Privacy Report Endorses “Do Not Track” Mechanism to Empower Online Consumers

This morning, the Federal Trade Commission released its long-anticipated privacy report. The report is the final result of a series of FTC privacy roundtables held earlier this year that solicited comments from leading scholars, industry figures and nonprofits including EFF about the consumer privacy challenges posed by new technologies. One of the main focuses of the FTC’s report is online […]

Wikileaks: Lessons For Consumer Privacy

The website Wikileaks recently published hundreds of thousands of confidential State Department cables. These communications apparently reveal the details of conversations with, and personal impressions and assessments of, foreign leaders and diplomats. Many fear that the leak will undermine international relations in profound and unknowable ways. One of the unintended consequence of the leak, however, may be to strengthen the […]

Common Sense and Security: Body Scanners, Accountability, and $2.4 Billion Worth of Security Theater

The Transportation Security Administration is feeling public heat these days over its combination of whole-body-image scanners and heavy-handed pat-down searches, and deservedly so. There’s no question that reform is needed to curtail TSA’s excesses. We especially applaud the Electronic Privacy Information Center’s efforts to increase public awareness about the body scanners. But will the heat now being generated produce the […]

EFF Brief: “Privacy” Protections for Corporations Undermines Government Transparency

EFF and a coalition of public interest groups urged the U.S. Supreme Court in an amicus brief Tuesday to reject so-called “privacy” protections for corporate entities under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The case, Federal Communications Commission v. AT&T, started when the company tried to block disclosure of records about its participation in the federal government’s E-Rate program. AT&T, […]

The FBI and Service Provider Wiretapping, or What’s In Your Wallet?

The FBI’s apparent desire to require all communications service providers to design a means for law enforcement to access encrypted communications in plain text could have negative effects on personal privacy and industry innovation. Computer scientists, however, concentrate on a different concern: the danger that such design mandates could harm cybersecurity.  In an ironic twist, the FBI’s well-intentioned attempt to […]